11/23/16

Check out The Millions for the essay.
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15 comments:

Matthew said...

I love this piece. xoxoxo

Shanna Mallon said...

what food writing should be like. well done -- and you've given me much to think about.

tessa said...

what a lovely essay! really well written. i can identify with so much of it. i really love francis weller also. i too came across him the sun magazine - one of my favourite magazines.

HAILEY said...

I read this twice. It hit home with me in a way that I can't explain in words just yet, but I really want to -- for myself and for the sake of being a part of a bigger conversation on the "pale expression of life" I too often find myself in. I guess for now I just want to say what a good writer you are. It's what keeps me coming back again and again. That, and your general relatable-ness, great recipes, humor, and cute Teddy videos! Great essay! I can't wait for your next book even if it doesn't come out until Teddy is in college. I think I'll still be a big fan for years to come.

tori said...

This is a fantastic, fantastic piece. Congratulations.

Caitlin Fahey said...

Thank you so so much for this. Beautifully written and quite timely.

Dani Elis said...

Just lovely x

Ariella Nudell said...

So great!

Personal note:
I suffered from stress-induced TMJ for 2 years! It go so bad I couldn't even open my mouth wide enough to eat a sandwich... I went to my dentist, specialists, nothing helped. Finally, I went to a PT that had worked on jaw pain before and in less than 6 mo I was able to eat anything I wanted! I still get *some* pain sporadically, but I have all the exercises he gave me so I'm able to stop it quickly.

PT = magic.

Thanks for the article - hope the jaw is better!

Unknown said...

Great essay. I hope your jaw gets better. For what it is worth, without these brave declarations, from the outside, you make it look easy. A great reminder that looks can be deceiving. Take care!

Jen said...

Such a beautiful essay. Thanks for sharing.

Amelia Morris said...

Thank you guys so much for reading and for the kind words. I love hearing from you!

@Ariella First off, 2 years? Geeeez. That's awful. Mine has come and gone--mostly, when it comes, it seems to just be a reminder to EASE the EF OFF. :)

@Unknown your comment made me think of that Brene Brown line (I think I heard it in her interview on On Being) about how when we meet someone, the first thing we look for are their vulnerabilities and at the same time, these are the things we are trying hardest to hide.

@HAILEY Thank you for coming back here time and time again!!

Tom Pugh said...

I find it so daunting to be turning into a proper adult in western culture because it's not a simple process of getting wiser and learning as you go. The reality that we're not prepared for is that, actually, learning how to survive and thrive is possibly more a matter of UNlearning. We are so taught to value certain things, aspire to a certain clinical standard of health, happiness and validity, that when we invariably meet disruption (career, kids, marriage, singelness, faith etc.) we're taken aback by how much we have to let go of. We're surprised to find that life isn't lived through the lens of a camera (let's be honest, stuff documented with a camera is the main way we're educated about what expect of life).

Ramble, ramble, ramble...

QUESTION: The term "soul" pops up at multiple points in your essay, mostly in quotes from Weller's book. What's your interpretation of that concept? It can be quite different from person to person, so I'm curious.

- TJ

Amelia Morris said...

@Tom Pugh

Hi Tom,

Ahh thank you so much for this comment! It's so true. I feel like at age 35 I am learning just how much what I've been striving for was never really my choice. Like, I never really considered an alternate route, or that an alternate route could be equally beautiful and successful. I keep wishing that I could be 14 all over again and given a Seventeen magazine filled with images of women in all shapes and colors and ages(!). Not to get too off topic but we're watching The Crown on Netflix and I see so many parallels to our current modern life: the monarchy holding so fast to the old ways of doing things just because "that's the way it is done!"

As for my interpretation of the word "soul"? It's a good question. It's a word that seems to have more of a feeling to it than a definition. BUT if I had to define it, I think it would be who we really are--minus all the repression and trying to please others and bargaining. It would be who we really are minus all the camouflage and disguises, minus all the bullshit. I think? OR in the words of Leonard Cohen, maybe it's who we are when we're not on Boogie street. (If you haven't heard this interview with him, you should! He's my current favorite person: http://www.npr.org/2016/11/25/503145023/remembering-leonard-cohen-singer-songwriter-and-poet)

Thanks again for commenting!! xoxx

Morgan Hagemeyer said...

I love everything you write.

Sarah said...

I loved this so very much. Thank you. Really really resonated.